Clinical and Translational Research Graduate Program


The Clinical and Translational Research (CTR) graduate program will prepare graduates with skills for successful careers in clinical and translational research and research support. The CTR program leading to a MS degree is currently offered with two tracks, both available in either Plan A (thesis option) or Plan B (capstone project option):

  1. Clinical Research (CR)
  2. Quantitative Health Sciences (QHS)

The CR track focuses on the study of methods suitable to investigate clinical research topics. Students enrolled in the CR track are required to complete a combination of course work and clinical research. The competency domains include clinical and translational research, quantitative health skill, professionalism, communication, and interdisciplinary collaboration. Students will also develop the ability to identify and resolve ethical issues in clinical research, to ensure the safeguarding of human subjects, and to understand the workings of Institutional Review Boards and relevant organizational requirements. In addition, students will develop and/or increase their capacity in obtaining research funding from agencies such as the National Institute of Health (NIH) and others. The QHS track contributes to a field that requires specific analytic skills and is one that is currently lacking sufficient numbers of experts. Students enrolled in the QHS track will acquire skills in biostatistics and bioinformatics, and master the scientific principles and methodologies that underlie basic science, and clinical and translational research methods.

In 2003, with Grant R25 RR019321, entitled, “Clinical Research Education and Career Development (CRECD) in Minority Institutions” the department established a curriculum to support a track in Clinical Research under the umbrella of the Master of Science in Clinical and Translational Research at the University of Hawai‘i (UH) John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM). This educational program was expanded with Grant U54 MD007584 (NIMHD/NIH) and Grant U54 RR026136 (NCRR), “RCMI Multidisciplinary And Translational Research Infrastructure eXpansion, (RMATRIX),” containing a Multidisciplinary Research Education, Training, & Career Development Key Function that emphasizes education and training in research methodologies addressing health disparities and other translational health initiatives in Hawai‘i.

Consistent with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) priorities, the program provides our multidisciplinary clinical-translational scientists and supporting staff with the knowledge, training, and career development skills needed to apply the best scientific strategies towards addressing targeted select HEALTH Initiatives (Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Cancer, Perinatal Growth & Development, Neurocognition & Aging, and Nutrition & Metabolism). These HEALTH Initiatives represent some of the most pressing health care needs of our communities.

In addition to offering knowledge and skills needed for careers in clinical and translational research, the program functions as a supportive mechanism for newly trained investigators, actively facilitating career development and encouraging research collaborations, particularly those related to health disparities research. By providing high quality training to doctoral and post-doctoral candidates, the program aims to increase the critical mass of clinical and translational research at UH, including its minority investigators. Targeting junior faculty, fellows, residents, and doctoral candidates from biomedical sciences, nursing, social work, psychology and public health, the interdisciplinary nature of the program broadens students’ perspectives and increases opportunities for innovative, cross-disciplinary collaborations in clinical and translational research. Graduates of the program pursue research and research support careers in academia, government laboratories, healthcare organizations, and pharmaceutical companies.

Regarding long-term career outlook and job opportunities for program graduates, the Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that the employment in clinical and associated research will grow overall by 8% in the US. The State of Hawai‘i projects a higher, 34.8%, growth rate in medical scientists, and a 13.9% growth rate in computer and mathematics-related occupations by 2020.

Admission Requirements

Requirements for admission into the MS in CTR (after completion of undergraduate degree):

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Personal statement with career goals
  • Undergraduate (and Medical School, if applicable) GPA 3.2 or greater
  • Undergraduate level course requirements: one semester biology, or one semester of pre-calculus, or equivalent coursework as determined by the Graduate Program Committee
  • At least three professional or academic letters of recommendation
  • Professional exams such as GRE and MCAT within the last 5 years, with scores above 50th percentile of the national average
  • For international students with non-English background, TOEFL (at least 90 for IBT and 570 for PBT) or IELTS (at least 7 on 9-point scale)

How to Apply

Fall 2018 Admission Deadline: May 30, 2018

Please visit the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Office of Graduate Education website to either fill out an online application or download a PDF form to submit.

Program Requirements

 

MS Plan A (Thesis Option)

 

Initial Conference with Graduate Program Chair

  • During the first week of the semester
  • Appointment of an interim academic advisor

Preliminary Conference(s) with Interim Academic Advisor

  • During the first month of the first semester
  • If any academic deficiencies are identified, a remediation plan will be developed between the interim academic advisor and the student
  • Relevant sections of the Pre-Candidacy Progress (Form I) will be used for the purpose of developing a remediation plan. The completed Form I will be submitted after the student has successfully passed the qualifying examination (please see below)

Qualifying Examination

  • Taken at the beginning of the Fall semester of the second year of residence
  • A closed book, multiple choice written and oral general examination, consisting of questions composed by graduate faculty members
  • Evaluates student's knowledge base of CTR core course contents (biostatistics, clinical and translational research methods, and either research ethics (CR track) or bioinformatics (QHS track))
  • Students must pass all sections of the exam at or above 80%

If the student passes the qualifying examination, the Pre-Candidacy Progress Form (Form I) can be submitted to the Office of Graduate Education (OGE). UHM Form I can be found at the website: https://manoa.hawaii.edu/graduate/content/forms

If the student fails the qualifying examination, the failed sections or the entire exam may be repeated once within 6 months of the first exam. A student who fails the qualifying examination a second time will be dismissed from the graduate program and the Office of Graduate Education.

 

Please refer to OGE exam policies for details at https://manoa.hawaii.edu/graduate/content/exam-policies

Coursework Requirements (the general credits requirements are the same for both CTR tracks, but the specific core courses are different for the two tracks. Please see section on curricula for details)

  • 34 total credit hours for the MS program
  • 24 credit hours of approved didactic core and elective course work (must be taken for an A-F letter grade)
  • 2 credit hours of seminar component (A-F grade)
  • Minimum of 8 credit hours of research component (at least 6 credits from BIOM 700; other credits can be from BIOM 699 or QHS 699)

MS Plan A Thesis Committee

  • Selection of a permanent advisor by the end of the first year who will also serve as the chair of the thesis committee
  • Appointment of at least two other members of graduate faculty to the thesis committee
  • Preparation of individualized timeline for MS Plan A

MS Comprehensive Examination & Advance to Candidacy

  • Consist of a written proposal and an oral presentation. The proposal should be based on the student's thesis research project, engaging in hypothesis driven research
  • Submission of the thesis topic and proposal to the thesis committee for review and approval as early as possible
  • Written proposal and proposal seminar should be completed by the end of the third semester of the student’s training
  • The written proposal should be submitted to the student’s thesis committee for review at least two weeks before the date of oral examination
  • The proposal should be prepared in consultation with the student’s thesis advisor and thesis committee members
  • The format of the written thesis proposal will be specified by the thesis committee, but should follow the general format of a grant proposal to a federal funding agency (e.g., NIH), including project summary and relevance, background and significance, specific aims, research design and methods, and preliminary studies.
  • The content of the oral examination will include fundamental concepts underlying the hypotheses addressed in the proposal, technical or experimental design issues, and any other topics that the committee considers pertinent to the student’s understanding of his/her research area
  • The majority of the committee must vote in favor in order for the student to pass the comprehensive exam

Note: Depending on the nature of the research project, the student may need to obtain specific certification, approvals, and guidance as required, e.g., Committee on Human Studies (www.hawaii.edu/irb/)[Phone: (808) 539-3955]; Environmental Health & Safety Office (www.hawaii.edu/ehso/)[Phone: (808) 956-8660]; Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (www.hawaii.edu/ansc/IACUC/)[Phone: (808) 956-4446].

If the student passes the comprehensive examination, the Advance to Candidacy Form (Form II) can be submittted to the Office of Graduate Education (OGE). UHM Form II can be found at the website https://manoa.hawaii.edu/graduate/content/forms.

If the student fails the comprehensive examination, the failed sections or the entire exam may be repeated once within 3 months of the first exam. A student who fails the comprehensive examination a second time will be dismissed from the graduate program and the Office of Graduate Education.

MS Thesis Defense / Final Examination

  • Research seminar and oral examination covering the thesis research and closely related areas
  • Exam conducted by the thesis committee
  • Seminar open to all graduate faculty, students and general public
  • To be held at least 3 weeks before the end of term during which degree is conferred
  • A student who failed the final examination may repeat it once at the discretion of the thesis committee
  • A student who fails the examination a second time will be dismissed from the program

Once the student has successfully passed the final exam, the Thesis Evaluation Form (Form III), a certification of the final oral exam and thesis defense by the thesis committee, can be submitted to the Graduate Division. With the approval of the written thesis by the thesis committee, the thesis submission form (Form IV) can be submitted to the Graduate Division. Both UHM Form III and Form IV can be found at the website https://manoa.hawaii.edu/graduate/content/forms.

   

MS Plan B (Capstone Project Option)

 

Initial Conference with Graduate Program Chair

  • During the first week of the semester
  • Appointment of an interim academic advisor

Preliminary Conference(s) with Interim Academic Advisor

  • During the first month of the first semester
  • If any academic deficiencies are identified, a remediation plan will be developed between the interim academic advisor and the student
  • Relevant sections of the Pre-Candidacy Progress (Form I) will be used for the purpose of developing a remediation plan. The completed Form I will be submitted to the Office of Graduate Education after the student has successfully passed the qualifying examination

Qualifying Examination

  • Taken at the beginning of Fall of the second year of residence
  • A closed book, multiple choice written and oral general examination, consisting of questions composed by graduate faculty members
  • Evaluates student's knowledge base of core course contents (biostatistics, clinical and translational research methods, and either research ethics (CR track) or bioinformatics (QHS track))
  • Students must pass all sections of the exam at or above 80%.

If the student passes the qualifying examination, the Pre-Candidacy Progress Form (Form I) can be submitted to the Office of Graduate Education. UHM Form I can be found at the website: https://manoa.hawaii.edu/graduate/content/forms

If the student fails the qualifying examination, the failed sections or the entire exam may be repeated once within 6 months of the first exam. A student who fails the qualifying examination a second time will be dismissed from the graduate program and the Office of Graduate Education.

Please refer to OGE exam policies for details at https://manoa.hawaii.edu/graduate/content/exam-policies

 

Coursework requirements (the general credits requirements are the same for both CR and QHS, but the specific core courses are different. Please see curricula section for details.)

  • 34 total credit hours for the MS program
  • 28 credit hours of approved didactic core and elective course work (must be taken for an A-F letter grade)
  • 2 credit hours of seminar component as a core requirement (A-F grade)
  • Minimum of 4 credit hours of research component (BIOM 699 or QHS 699)

MS Plan B Committee

  • Appointment of a permanent adviser by the end of the first year
  • Appointment of two other members of graduate faculty members from the program graduate faculty list
  • Preparation of individualized timeline for MS Plan B

Study Program and Capstone Project Proposal

  • Meet with committee to decide on research project before the start of the third semester
  • Take additional courses, if needed
  • Submit capstone project proposal, approved by the committee

Capstone Project Presentation / Final Examination

  • Submit a written paper covering the project
  • Presentation of the capstone project to the committee, at least 3 weeks before the end of term during which degree is conferred
  • At the discretion of the committee, the presentation can be made as a seminar
  • A student who failed the final examination may repeat it once at the discretion of the Plan B committee
  • A student who fails the examination a second time will be dismissed from the program and the Office of Graduate Education
  • Completion and internal filing of modified Progress Report Form III
  • Certification of completion of research seminar and written paper

Please refer to OGE exam policies for details at https://manoa.hawaii.edu/graduate/content/exam-policies

Note: Depending on the nature of the research project, the student may need to obtain specific certification, approvals and guidance as required, e.g., Committee on Human Studies (www.hawaii.edu/irb/) [Phone: (808) 539-3955]; Environmental Health & Safety Office (www.hawaii.edu/ehso/) [Phone: (808) 956-8660]; Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (www.hawaii.edu/ansc/IACUC/) [Phone: (808) 956-4446].

Once the student has successfully passed the final exam, an MS Graduate Program Memo, indicating the student's successful completion of the MS Plan B, will be submitted by the graduate program chair to the Office of Graduate Student Services.

MS Curriculum

Prerequisites: All students are required to have a background of undergraduate courses in biology and mathematics. At least one semester of undergraduate level biology and one semester of pre-calculus course are required.

Plan A Plan B
  • 24 didactic credits
  • 2 seminar credits
  • 8 research credits (6 credits for BIOM 700 + 2 credits for QHS 699)
  • Comprehensive exam in Fall of second year
  • Thesis exam in Fall of second year when Form 2 is submitted
  • Oral defense when Forms 3 and 4 are submitted
  • 28 didactic credits
  • 2 seminar credits
  • 4 research credits for QHS 699
  • Comprehensive exam in Fall of second year
  • Capstone project presentation


Section A. MS Required Core Courses

    Course # Course Title Credit Hours
    BIOM 640 Introduction to Clinical Research 3
    BIOM 644 Translation Research Methods 2
    QHS 601 Biomedical Statistics I 3
     QHS 602 Biomedical Statistics II 3
    BIOM 646 Clinical and Translational Research Seminar* 2

    * Enrollment in this one-credit seminar each semester for A-F grade is required for the first year.

 

Section B. Track Required Courses

  1. Clinical Research (CR) Track
    Course # Course Title Credit Hours
    BIOM 641 Legal and Regulatory Issues and Bioethics 2
    BIOM 645 Clinical Protocol Development 3
    QHS 620 Introduction to Clinical Trials 2
    Plan A:
    BIOM 700
    BIOM 699
    MS Thesis Research
    Directed Research
    8+**
    Elective Courses 4+
    Plan B:
    BIOM 699 Directed Research 4+
    Elective Courses 8+

    ** Plan A requires that at least 6 research credits are from BIOM 700.


  2. Quantitative Health Sciences (QHS) Track
    Course # Course Title Credit Hours
    QHS 610 Bioinformatics I 3
    QHS 621 Design and Analysis of Clinical Trials 2
    QHS 650 Secondary Data Analysis 2
    Plan A:
    BIOM 700
    BIOM 699
    MS Thesis Research
    Directed Research
    8+**
    Elective Courses 4+
    Plan B:
    QHS 699 Directed Research 4+
    Elective Courses 8+

    ** Plan A requires that at least 6 research credits are from BIOM 700.


Section C. Selected Elective Courses

To be selected by the student and his/her thesis advisor and committee according to the student's interests and needs (Please see UH Manoa graduate catalog for additional and updated course listings).

  1. From BIOM, CAAM, PHRM, and QHS
    Course # Course Title Credit Hours
    BIOM 654 Medical Genetics 2
    CAAM 401 Mindfulness 1
    CAAM 445 Integrative Medicine 3
    QHS 611 Bioinformatics II 3
    QHS 651 Secondary Data Analysis Practicum 2

  2. From Other Related programs
    Course # Course Title Credit Hours
    Cell & Molecular Biology (CMB)
    CMB 606 Introduction to Neurosciences 4
    CMB 625 Advanced Topics in Genetics 2
    CMB 640 Neuropharmacology 2
    Geography (GEOG)
    GEOG 388 Introduction to GIS 3
    GEOG 389 GIS Data Visualization 3
    GEOG 489 Applied Geographic Information Systems 3
    GEOG 680 Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resource Data 3
    Information and Computer Sciences (ICS)
    ICS 435 Machine Learning Fundamentals 3
    ICS 475 Introduction to Bioinformatics Sequences and Genome Analysis 3
    ICS 484 Data Visualization 3
    ICS 614 Medical Informatics I 3
    ICS 624 Advanced Data Management 3
    ICS 635 Machine Learning 3
    ICS 663 Pattern Recognition 3
    Molecular Biosciences & Bioengineering (MBBE)
    MBBE 650 DNA and Genetic Analysis 2
    MBBE 683 Advanced Bioinformatics Topics for Biologists 4
    Public Health Sciences (PH)
    PH 650 Ecological Epidemiology 2
    PH 658 Computer Applications in Public Health 3
    PH 663 Principles of Epidemiology I 3
    PH 664 Principles of Epidemiology II 3
    PH 669 Epidemiology Study Design Critique 2
    PH 689 Nutritional Epidemiology 3
    PH 747 Statistical Methods in Epidemiologic Research 3
    Tropical Medicine (TRMD)
    TRMD 675 Epidemiology of Tropical Infectious Diseases 3



CR Track

Year 1
Fall Spring
Course Credits Course Credits
QHS 601
Biomedical Statististics
3 QHS 602
Biomedical Statistics II
3
BIOM 640
Introduction to Clinical Research
3 BIOM 641
Legal and Regulatory Issues and Bioethics
2
BIOM 645
Clinical Protocol Development
3 QHS 644
Translation Methods
2
Electives 2+
BIOM 646
CTR Seminar
1 BIOM 646
CTR Seminar
1
Subtotal 10 10+
Year 2
Fall Spring
Course Credits Course Credits
QHS 620
Introduction to Clinical Trials
2
Electives 2-6 Electives 2-6
Plan B:
QHS 699
Directed Research
v Plan B:
QHS 699
Directed Research
v
Plan B:
BIOM 700
Thesis Research
v Plan B:
BIOM 700
Thesis Research
v
Subtotal 8+ 8+


QHS Track

Year 1
Fall Spring
Course Credits Course Credits
QHS 601
Biomedical Statististics
3 QHS 602
Biomedical Statistics II
3
QHS 610
Bioinformatics I
3 BIOM 644
Translational Research Methods
2
BIOM 640
Introduction to Clinical Research
3 QHS 650
Secondary Data Analysis
2
Electives 2+
BIOM 646
CTR Seminar
1 BIOM 646
CTR Seminar
1
Subtotal 10 10+
Year 2
Fall Spring
Course Credits Course Credits
QHS 621
Design and Analysis of Clinical Trials
2
Electives 2-6 Electives 2-6
Plan B:
QHS 699
Directed Research
v Plan B:
QHS 699
Directed Research
v
Plan A:
BIOM 700
Thesis Research
v Plan A:
BIOM 7000
Thesis Research
v
Subtotal 8+ 8+

MS Key Course Descriptions

BIOM 640 Introduction to Clinical Research (3) Instruction in developing clinical research questions and creating a concise protocol that includes a literature review, study design, subject recruitment and sampling, instruments, other measures and bioinformatics, sample size, consent form, budget and timetable. A-F only. Pre: consent.

BIOM 641 Legal and Regulatory Issues and Bioethics (2) Ethical dilemmas in clinical research are identified and resolved in case studies, research on human subjects regulation are discussed. Research misconduct is defined. Ethical considerations in protocol development. A-F only. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed with CMB 626)

BIOM 644 Translational Research Methods (2) Lectures focus on translational research methods through selected genetic and acquired diseases including cancer, neurodevelopmental, inflammatory-immune and metabolic disorders with insight into analyses of DNA, RNA, genomics-proteomics, cell and animal models, and advanced imaging.  A-F only. Pre: consent.

BIOM 645 Clinical Protocol Development (3) Provides training in proposal development. Governance structures of funding agencies; funding opportunities and decisions; review processes; NIH application and processes; reading RFAs; compliance issues; cultural sensitivity; and types of questions using databases are addressed. A-F only. Pre: consent.

BIOM 646 Clinical Research Seminar (1) Provides overview of research related to health and health disparities in Hawai'i. Seminar topics include ethnic disparities in health research, Native Hawaiian health, childhood research initiatives, fitness and obesity, social and cultural factors and ethics. Repeatable six times. A-F only. Pre: consent.

BIOM 654 Medical Genetics (2) Lectures focus on heritable disorders, genetic mechanisms, patterns of inheritance, phenotype-genotype correlations, genetic/environmental factors, clinical diagnoses, genomic and precision medicine. A-F only. Pre: consent.

BIOM 699 Directed Research (V) Students may register on approval of department. CR/NC only. Repeatable unlimited times.

BIOM 700 Thesis Research (V) Research for master's thesis. Repeatable unlimited times. CR/NC only. Pre: consent.

QHS 601 Biomedical Statistics I (3) Fundamental biomedical statistics concepts and tools will be introduced, as well as their applications to biomedical data. Students will perform hands-on analysis and learn to interpret and present the results. A-F only. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed with TRMD 655)

QHS 602 Biomedical Statistics II (3) Advanced biomedical statistics principles and tools as well as their applications will be introduced. Topics include: model selection, hierarchical model, repeated measurements, classification methods, structural equation modeling and multivariate analysis. A-F only. Pre: QHS 601 or consent.

QHS 610 Bioinformatics I (3) Provides concepts in bioinformatics with an emphasis on hands-on training. Covers topics such as molecular biology, sequence alignment, biological databases, phylogeny, and genomics including microarray and RNA-seq data analysis. A-F only. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed with TRMD 653)

QHS 611 Bioinformatics II (3) Focuses on bioinformatics approaches for functional genomics related to DNA, RNA, and protein. Provides overview of virus, bacteria, and human genome and bioinformatics approaches to human disease. A-F only. Pre: QHS 610 or consent.

QHS 620 Introduction to Clinical Trials (2) Introduction to clinical trials. Topics include history, definitions/terminology, adverse events, FDA and government regulatory agencies, ethics, monitoring committees, recruitment, introduction to protocol development, basic designs. A-F only. Pre: consent.

QHS 621 Design and Analysis of Clinical Trials (2) Basic and advanced statistical methods utilized in clinical trials designs, conduct, and data analyze. Topics covers statistician’s role in drug development and DSMB, statistical theory in phase I-IV clinical trial designs and analysis. A-F only. Pre: QHS 601 or consent.

QHS 650 Secondary Data Analysis (2) Allows students who are new to using secondary data to become comfortable with accessing the data, forming hypotheses, and designing study proposals. It will introduce by examples both basic and advanced techniques. A-F only. Pre: consent.

QHS 651 Secondary Data Analysis Practicum (2) Introduces students to issues in working with complex data sets and add the hands on experience needed to conduct individual research using secondary databases. A-F only. Pre: QHS 601 and QHS 650 or consent.

QHS 699 Directed Research (1-3 credits) Introduction to issues in working with complex data sets and add the hands on experience needed to conduct individual research using secondary databases. CR/NC only. Pre: consent.

MS Student Learning Outcomes

All students are expected to have developed the following competencies upon completion of the graduate program:

  • Familiarity with the mechanics of scientific reporting sufficient to enable the students to prepare a publication for a scholarly journal
  • Experience with oral presentation of material sufficient to enable the students to prepare and deliver reports on their work at seminars or meetings of scientific societies
  • A degree of understanding and scientific maturity to enable the students to assess the work of others
  • Knowledge of the process of clinical and translational research, including familiarity with techniques for searching the literature, principles of measurements, and practical experience in the design and conduct of scientific experiments, collection of data, and interpretation of data in the context of the scientific literature, and to embark upon the development of a research and research support career
  • Demonstrate proficiency in written and verbal communication skills as required in various professional duties, including manuscripts for publication, grant applications, and conference presentations.

Specific to Clinical Research (CR) Concentration:

  • Demonstrate a knowledge based in various disciplines of clinical and translational research
  • Develop knowledge and skills to form a foundation upon which to function in an ethical and professional manner through their professional careers
  • Demonstrate skills and knowledge required for clinical and translational research design and critical evaluation of data collection methodologies

Specific to Quantitative Health Sciences (QHS) Track:

  • Demonstrate the knowledge and skills in quantitative health sciences, including biostatistics and bioinformatics
  • Demonstrate sufficient mastery and scientific maturity to assess the analytic work of peers in related fields
  • Demonstrate a mastery of experimental, clinical and translational research design and data analysis methodologies, including clinical trials

These educational outcomes are closely aligned with the approved UHM Advanced Degree Institutional Learning Objective (ILOs). The indicator/evidence for each of the seven ILOs of the proposed modified program is summarized in the following table:

Table. Alignment of CTR Program-specific objectives and learning indicators with the UHM Advanced Degree Institutional Learning Objectives (ILOs), Version 8 (UHM Senate approved Sept 20, 2017).

Learning Outcomes Program Learning Indicators and Evidence
ILO Major Focus Agenda 1 — Knowledge and Understanding
1. Comprehensive knowledge Comprehensive exam
Thesis defense
Research proposal, including literature review
2. Understanding of research methodology Course exams
Comprehensive exam
Research proposal
Thesis defense
ILO Major Focus Agenda 2 — Intellectual and Applied Skills
3. Research methodology and scholarly inquiry techniques Oral and/or written critiques of research papers
Hypothesis-driven original research project
Research proposal or grant proposal
Critical feasibility assessments, research design, and data analysis plan
4. Critical analyze and synthesize information and data Critical review of relevant literature
Statistical analysis of the research data
Written synthesis and interpretation of data analysis results
ILO Major Focus Agenda 3 — Communication Skills
5. Communicate appropriately Written research project proposal
Oral presentations, group discussions, and participation at scientific forums
Effective online communication
ILO Major Focus Agenda 4 — Professional Responsibility
6. Responsible, ethical, professional conduct of research Professional:
Training in responsible conduct of research
Setting of timely and feasible goals
Appropriate priorities and conclusions
Adherence to research and publication standards and policies (authorship, collaborative efforts, data sharing, conflicts of interest)
Following through on commitments
Adherence to timelines

Ethical:
Formal training in research ethics
Adherence to ethical principles, including data handling
Commitment to protection of research subjects
Written ethical components to research projects and/or proposals
IRB approval of research projects
7. Interact professionally Performance at professional meetings (platform and poster presentations)
Active involvement during lectures and poster sessions at meetings
Cultural competence and sensitivity to cultural values (including kuleana and aloha)

Tuition & Financial Aid

The most current UHM graduate tuition and financial aid information can be found at the following websites:
 https://www.hawaii.edu/fas/basics/student_budget/
 https://www.hawaii.edu/fas/basics/types_of_aid/

Graduate Assistantships (GAs)

Limited and selective program graduate and research assistantships are offered by the Department of Complementary & Integrative Medicine (CIM) to outstanding MS students, usually during their second year of study. The CIM Admissions and Awards Committee administers the departmental GAs for students to work at department-operated school facilities and units, such as Biostatistics Core or Bioinformatics Core.

The two types of GAs that exist are:

  1. Teaching Assistantship (TA): Usually a 9-month appointment during the academic year. Specific duties vary, but they generally consist of serving under the supervision of a faculty member to assist in the teaching of a course.
  2. Research Assistantship (RA): In general, a RA supports the research and service activities of a faculty who is the principal investigator of a funded project. The specific duties of a RA vary depending on the needs of the project and on the qualifications and ex­periences of the RA. The duties may be directly or tangentially related to the RA’s program of study, while results from the research project may be incorporated into a thesis or dissertation as relevant. Some RAs exercise a great degree of inde­pendence while performing their duties; others carry out specific tasks that leave little room for independent judgment. RAs should be knowledgeable about official university policies on research and publi­cation. RA appointments usually have an 11-month appointment.
  • Compensation: GA compensation adheres to the schedule (based on 0.50 FTE per year) approved by the UH Board of Regents. Newly appointed GAs/RAs are compensated at a pay step recommended by the department or unit of hire. GAs/RAs with research duties are usually appointed at pay steps depending on their qualifications and experiences, the needs of their departments or units, and the availability of funds.
  • Tuition Exemption: GAs with 0.50 FTE appointments may receive a full tuition exemption. New GA with 11-month appointment must be employed for at least 12 weeks during the first se­mester in order to receive the tuition ex­emption. Tuition exemptions apply only to fall and spring semesters, and may not be used for Outreach College and Dis­tance Education courses. Summer Ses­sion tuition exemptions, when available, are issued by the Outreach College. GAs are responsible for the payment of fees. GAs who resign before serving at least three-quarters of a semester are liable for repayment of tuition exemptions.
  • Health Plan & Parking Permits: GAs with 0.50 FTE appoint­ment who serve for a mini­mum of three months are eli­gible for health plan benefits. For more information, contact the personnel officer in the department or unit of hire. To purchase parking permits, GAs need to obtain first a memo from their department or unit of hire. They then pres­ent the memo along with all other required documents to the Parking and Transportation Services.

Office of Graduate Education Achievement Awards

A limited number of merit-based Graduate Division Achievement Scholar­ships are available to qualified graduate students.

  • Eligibility & How to Apply: To be eligible, a student must be a student in the master’s program and have a cumulative GPA of 3.8 or above. Students apply through the MS graduate programs. These awards are very competitive.
  • Award Amount: The award amount varies, depending on the purpose of the award and funding availability. Minimum award is $500.
  • Award Conditions: Award recipients must maintain an enrollment of six credits or more of degree-related courses and a cumulative GPA of 3.8 or above, for the entire period of the award. If the student becomes ineligible for this award prior to the start of a term, he/she will forfeit the award and future terms of award application may be affected.
  • Award Distribution Procedure: The Office of Graduate Education allocates achievement scholarships to graduate programs, which in turn distribute the awards to qualified students via BANNER and STAR at the time of registration.

Other Financial Support Opportunities

Besides the mechanisms described above, there are other intramural and extramural funding opportunities available to CTR graduate students.  For more information on these resources, please consult the Graduate Division funding opportuni­ties site:
  http://manoa.hawaii.edu/graduate/content/financial-support

Finding Work at UHM Campuses

GA positions in other departments may also be available. The University of Hawaiʻi's 10-campus system offers a wide range of career opportunities throughout the State of Hawaiʻi. Employment within the University system includes competitive compensation and benefits, a supportive work environment, and the opportunity to build a lifelong commitment to education by joining the ranks of our renowned scholars and researchers and dedicated staff. To search for GA positions at UH, please visit the following UH job website (select “Graduate Assistant” under “Position Type” box):
http://workatuh.hawaii.edu/Search

CIM Faculty & Staff

Regular Graduate Faculty

NameTitleOfficeEmailPhone
Hyeong Jun Ahn
Ph.D.
Assistant ProfessorMEB
411 F
hjahn@hawaii.edu(808) 692-1822
Amy Brown
Ph.D.
Associate ProfessorMEB
411 C
amybrown@hawaii.edu(808) 692-0907
John J. Chen
Ph.D.
Professor & Interim Chair
Director, Biostatistics Core
MEB
411 G
jjchen@hawaii.edu(808) 692-1814
Katalin Csiszar
Ph.D.
Professor
Graduate Program Chair, MSCTR
BIOMED
T415
katalin@hawaii.edu(808) 956-9452
James Davis
Ph.D.
Associate ProfessorMEB
411 D
jamesdav@hawaii.edu(808) 692-1806
Youping Deng
Ph.D.
Professor
Director, Bioinformatics Core
BSB
325 B
dengy@hawaii.edu(808) 692-1664
Vedbar Khadka
Ph.D.
Assistant ProfessorMEB
411-14
vedbar@hawaii.edu(808) 692-1462
Eunjung Lim
Ph.D.
Assistant ProfessorMEB
411 E
lime@hawaii.edu(808) 692-1817
Terry Shintani
M.D.
Clinical ProfessorMEB
411-5
terrys@hawaii.edu(808) 566-6922
Chathura Siriwardhana
Ph.D.
Assistant ProfessorMEB
411-13
cksiri@hawaii.edu(808) 692-1487

Cooperating Graduate Faculty

NameHome Department or CenterResearch Interests
Marla Berry, Ph.D.CMBSelenoproteins, antioxidants and human diseases
William Boisvert, Ph.D.MedicineCardiovascular research
Mariana Gerschenson, Ph.D.CMBMitochondrial medicine, metabolic and neurological diseases
Jerris Hedges, M.D.Dean's OfficeMedical education, emergency medicine
Brenda Hernandez, Ph.D.Cancer CenterHPV-induced carcinogenesis, ethnic disparities in cancers
Claire Townsend Ing, Ph.D.Native Hawaiian HealthSocial determinants of health disparities, CBPR
Lynn Iwamoto, M.D.PediatricsPediatrics
Joseph Keaweʻaimoku Kaholokula, Ph.D.Native Hawaiian HealthNative Hawaiian Health
Bliss Kaneshiro, M.D.OBGYNUnintended pregnancy, contraceptive use
Alan Katz, Ph.D.Public HealthEpidemiology, infectious diseases
Sandi Kwee, Ph.D.Cancer CenterCancer detection, positron emission tomography
Loic Le Marchand, Ph.D.Cancer CenterEpidemiology, cancer research
Kamal Masaki, M.D.Geriatric MedicineGeriatric Medicine
Michelle Matter, Ph.D.CMBIntegrin regulated cell survival and apoptosis
DeWolf Miller, Ph.D.CMBEpidemiology
Charles Neal, Ph.D.PediatricsNeuroanatomical studies
Vivek Nerurkar, Ph.D.Tropical MedicinePathogenesis of infectious diseases, cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying microbe-host interaction
Jun Panee, Ph.D.CMBSelenoproteins and natural products as antioxidants
Marie Fialkowski Revilla, Ph.D.Human NutritionNutrition, child health assessment
Beatriz L. Rodriguez, M.D., Ph.D.Geriatric MedicineEpidemiology, chronic diseases
Jennifer SalcedoOBGYNBarriers to reproductive healthcare
Cecilia Shikuma, M.D.MedicineInfectious diseases, AIDS
Bruce Shiramizu, M.D.PediatricsPathology of HIV-associated disorders
Ralph Shoet, M.D.MedicineMolecular medicine
Reni Soon, M.D.OBGYNReproductive Health
Andy StengerMedicineNeurosciences, particle astrophysics
Deborah Taira, Ph.D.UH HiloHealth policy and management
Michelle Tallquist, Ph.D.MedicineCardiovascular biology and birth defects
W. Steve Ward, Ph.D.AnatomySperm physiology and genetics, assisted reproduction technology
Bradley Willcox, M.D.GeriatricsAging research
Kelley Withy, M.D., Ph.D.Family MedicineFamily medicine
Research

Master of Science in Clinical and Translational Research
Department of Complementary & Integrative Medicine

University of Hawaiʻi John A. Burns School of Medicine
651 Ilalo Street
Medical Education Building, Suite 411
Honolulu, HI 96813

Phone: (808) 692-1840
Email: GradCTR@hawaii.edu

We are located at the University of Hawaiʻi John A. Burns School of Medicine Kakaʻako Campus

JABSOM Manoa


651 Ilalo Street, Medical Education Building, Suite 411, Honolulu, HI 96813


Phone: 808.692.1840 // Fax: 808.692.1966

© Department of Complementary & Integrative Medicine, University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine